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noralorek

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Nora Lorek

Bio Photojournalist from Sweden. For more info about the situation in Uganda & South Sudan and how to help:

Web sitehttps://donate.unhcr.org/int-en/south-sudan?set_country=INT

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Nora Lorek

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Calais JungleReportShareDownload32990

Leftovers after the eviction of the southern half of the Jungle refugee camp in Calais early 2016. I remember walking around among burning shelters that once were homes. Looking at the ground. The things that were left when the French police came in the morning and families with children had to leave their homes once again. Running away from flames like back home in the war of their countries. I remember seeing the cover on a Iranien passport lying in the mud, reminding me of how privileged I am in having a German and a Swedish passport: free to travel, move and work in so many countries without ever being questioned. So many times that I wished that I could just give away one of my passports. This bloddy piece of paper that decides whether we’re good enough to live in a certain country or not..These pictures are from my long term project in the refugee camp called Jungle in Calais, France. Before it was demolished in October last year 10 000 refugees were living here in temporary shelters. Today there’re still many refugees in and around Calais trying to join there families on the other side of the English Channel.

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Nora Lorek

Nora Lorek - @noralorek Instagram Photo
Calais JungleReportShareDownload251.03K

Today it’s been four weeks since Yassins father died in Syria. Yassin was living in the Jungle for almost a year but even after the refugee camp was demolished it took him eight months to get to UK. With his family living in Syria and Lebanon I remember him being constantly worried but still taking care of all his friends and neighbors and keeping an eye on me when being in the camp working at night. I still remember when he wrote me the 7th of May after arriving to England. About the fact that he had been too shy to ask for help and had been sleeping in the streets of Belgium and France and almost given up. In this picture from April 2016 he had just received a English Arabic dictionary from his friend in UK and was sitting in his shelter trying to talk to me and teaching me some Arabic..This picture is from my long term project in the refugee camp called Jungle in Calais, France. Before it was demolished in October last year 10 000 refugees were living here in temporary shelters. Today there’re still many refugees in and around Calais trying to join there families on the other side of the English Channel.

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Calais JungleReportShareDownload121.08K

The Jungle was a refugee camp in the vicinity of Calais, France. According to Help Refugees 9106 men, women and unaccompanied children were living in mud, tents or temporary shelters they’d build themselves and decorate as best as possible. They all had the same goal: to enter the UK..In October 2016 the eviction of the Jungle started and after three weeks the camp was demolished and the remaining refugees were moved to temporary asylum accommodations. Bedrooms, TV-halls, restaurants, living rooms and mosques were replaced by white walls in cold bedrooms shared with strangers. These are some of the walls inside the Jungle.

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Nora Lorek

Nora Lorek - @noralorek Instagram Photo
Calais JungleReportShareDownload14866

Police is patrolling around the clock at the beach near the ferry port of Calais. Here the refugees have up to four minutes to run along the one kilometer long open beach area and then get past the fences and hide on the other side before the next patrol has passed. There are only few who manage to get all the way to the ferry parking lot and who are not detected in the truck controls or scanner. Once on the ferry it takes 90 minutes to Dover in the UK..This picture is from my long term project in the refugee camp called Jungle in Calais, France. Before it was demolished in October last year 10 000 refugees were living here in temporary shelters. Today there’re still many refugees in and around Calais trying to join there families on the other side of the English Channel.

Nora Lorek - @noralorek Instagram Profile Photonoralorek

Nora Lorek

Nora Lorek - @noralorek Instagram Photo
Calais JungleReportShareDownload9767

Hadi Elya is from Pakistan and was living in the Jungle with his cousins Zeeshan and Haider. He lived in Austria for 8 months, but did not get a residence permit. After six months in the Jungle, they decided to apply for asylum in France. When the Jungle was evicted in October 2016 he and his friends were moved to an accomendation in the south of France. Two weeks ago and after waiting for 20 months his asylum application was rejected..This picture is from my long term project in the refugee camp called Jungle in Calais, France. Before it was demolished in October last year 10 000 refugees were living here in temporary shelters. Today there’re still many refugees in and around Calais trying to join there families on the other side of the English Channel.

Nora Lorek - @noralorek Instagram Profile Photonoralorek

Nora Lorek

Nora Lorek - @noralorek Instagram Photo
Calais JungleReportShareDownload8869

When taking a break from trying to cross the border at night, many of the refugees met at restaurants or shops where they could buy everything from soft drinks to mobile chargers and SIM cards. Khan from Pakistan was one of the few shop owners that continued his business until the very last day. .This picture is from my long term project in the refugee camp called Jungle in Calais, France. Before it was demolished in October last year 10 000 refugees were living here in temporary shelters. Today there’re still many refugees in and around Calais trying to join there families on the other side of the English Channel.

Nora Lorek - @noralorek Instagram Profile Photonoralorek

Nora Lorek

Nora Lorek - @noralorek Instagram Photo
Calais JungleReportShareDownload13996

Wessam, 21, and his parents fled Syria just before the war broke out and ended up in Jordan. He had to leave his family and arrived in the Jungle October 21, 2015. Among the guys from Daraa, he is called Mama because he’s cooking in their neighborhood. After many attempts and eight months in the camp he was finally united with his brother in Manchester..This picture is from my long term project in the refugee camp called Jungle in Calais, France. Before it was demolished in October last year 10 000 refugees were living here in temporary shelters. Today there’re still many refugees in and around Calais trying to join there families on the other side of the English Channel.

Nora Lorek - @noralorek Instagram Profile Photonoralorek

Nora Lorek

Nora Lorek - @noralorek Instagram Photo
Calais JungleReportShareDownload33987

Dandan, Wessam and Ibrahim from Daraa in Syria met here in the fall of 2015 and moved in together shortly thereafter. Back then there were about 3500 refugees in the camp and new people arriving every day. In the north part of the Jungle they settled at an area for Syrians, mostly from Daraa. The first few months they tried to get on trains and trucks, but in the end they managed to collect money and chose to pay for smugglers. Even with smugglers they failed dozens of times. Since July 2016, all three are with their relatives in the UK and claimed asylum..This picture is from my long term project in the refugee camp called Jungle in Calais, France. Before it was demolished in October last year 10 000 refugees were living here in temporary shelters. Today there’re still many refugees in and around Calais trying to join there families on the other side of the English Channel.

Nora Lorek - @noralorek Instagram Profile Photonoralorek

Nora Lorek

Nora Lorek - @noralorek Instagram Photo
Calais JungleReportShareDownload24808

Today it’s been a year since the final demolition of the refugee camp called Jungle started. For those of you who weren’t following me back then I’m going to share some old pictures from my months in the back than biggest refugee camp in Europe. 10000 people were living here in Calais, France. Trying to get over the channel and to UK or still waiting for asylum in France. These shelters became their home and their neighbors from different countries, cultures and religion became their new family. This picture was taken during the eviction of the south part of the Jungle early 2016. 3500 refugees including children lost their homes. Several people chose to set their shelter on fire before forces could destroy them. Others caught on fire because of the tear gas.

Nora Lorek - @noralorek Instagram Profile Photonoralorek

Nora Lorek

Nora Lorek - @noralorek Instagram Photo

“I had six children. One was recently killed by rebels. Four of them are in South Sudan and my daughter Anna is the only one who’s here with me and my husband. She just broke her legs and is in hospital.”Dobora Doing is 80 years old and now taking care of 15 children. Some are her grandchildren and the others of her brothers who died..“I was here during the war in the 90’s. Back then red cross was there to help us and it was ok.”“Since the community doesn’t want us (Dinkas) here it’s difficult to raise the children. The kids don’t understand what’s wrong when they want to play with the neighbors’ toys but are bullied. We even have to pray at a separate church. At least I have my husband here with me. I was 15 years old when we got married and we always got along.”“I have never been sewing Milayas but my daughter in law made me some. We were cattle keepers so we had to take care of the animals instead of learning how to sew.”.In August the one millionth refugee from South Sudan entered Uganda in escape of the war. With most of the refugees being women and children and leaving during shootings at night their bedsheets called Milaya are often one of the few things they carry with them. The handmade patterns have been made in South Sudan and Sudan for generations and the tradition of the Milayas continues in what has become their temporary home while waiting for the war to end. Bidibidi is with its more than 270 000 people considered one of the worlds largest refugee settlements..On assignment for @natgeoJuly/August 2017.

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