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List brrridger's Instagram Freshly emerged Painted Lady butterfly #csubugzoo #pollinatormonday 1611748424843392296_393062150

Freshly emerged Painted Lady butterfly #csubugzoo #pollinatormonday

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List monarch_watch's Instagram Soldier beetles, monarchs & cloudless sulphur butterflies. #pollinatormonday @monarch_watch 1611747046830468714_4013764083

Soldier beetles, monarchs & cloudless sulphur butterflies. #pollinatormonday @monarch_watch

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List buyurness's Instagram Καληθθθθθθπέρα!. This #pollinatormonday showcases a curious kinkajou from the New York State Zoo. This furry pollinator is native to Central and South America, and is a member of the Procyonidae family, making it a distant cousin of the Raccoon. The kinkajou has ankles that can rotate 180 degrees which allows it to run very quickly down trees to evade predators like the harpy eagle. The kinkajou is often known as the “honey bear” due to its habit of raiding beehives for their honey, much to the dismay of the bees. Its short, coarse fur is natural protection against angry bee stings. When not raiding hives, its five-inch tongue allows it to easily dip into the flowers of fruit-bearing trees in the rain forest. This long tongue coupled with an insatiable sweet tooth makes the kinkajou a valuable pollinator for many fruits and flowers in the rain forest. Though classified basically as a carnivore, the kinkajou will go from flower to flower, drinking nectar, and spreading the pollen on its fur to the next tasty snack. Now that’s a handy sweet tooth! 1611733807206113520_9169544

Καληθθθθθθπέρα!. This #pollinatormonday showcases a curious kinkajou from the New York State Zoo. This furry pollinator is native to Central and South America, and is a member of the Procyonidae family, making it a distant cousin of the Raccoon. The kinkajou has ankles that can rotate 180 degrees which allows it to run very quickly down trees to evade predators like the harpy eagle. The kinkajou is often known as the “honey bear” due to its habit of raiding beehives for their honey, much to the dismay of the bees. Its short, coarse fur is natural protection against angry bee stings. When not raiding hives, its five-inch tongue allows it to easily dip into the flowers of fruit-bearing trees in the rain forest. This long tongue coupled with an insatiable sweet tooth makes the kinkajou a valuable pollinator for many fruits and flowers in the rain forest. Though classified basically as a carnivore, the kinkajou will go from flower to flower, drinking nectar, and spreading the pollen on its fur to the next tasty snack. Now that’s a handy sweet tooth!

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List angelababbit's Instagram Soldier beetles, monarchs, cloudless sulphur butterflies. #pollinatormonday @monarch_watch 1611729242159192270_1252413242

Soldier beetles, monarchs, cloudless sulphur butterflies. #pollinatormonday @monarch_watch

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List luisserrano's Instagram #repost from @natgeo 
Image by @joelsartore | This #pollinatormonday showcases a curious kinkajou from the New York State Zoo. This furry pollinator is native to Central and South America, and is a member of the Procyonidae family, making it a distant cousin of the Raccoon. The kinkajou has ankles that can rotate 180 degrees which allows it to run very quickly down trees to evade predators like the harpy eagle. The kinkajou is often known as the “honey bear” due to its habit of raiding beehives for their honey, much to the dismay of the bees. Its short, coarse fur is natural protection against angry bee stings. When not raiding hives, its five-inch tongue allows it to easily dip into the flowers of fruit-bearing trees in the rain forest. This long tongue coupled with an insatiable sweet tooth makes the kinkajou a valuable pollinator for many fruits and flowers in the rain forest. Though classified basically as a carnivore, the kinkajou will go from flower to flower, drinking nectar, and spreading the pollen on its fur to the next tasty snack. Now that’s a handy sweet tooth!
To see another image of this kinkajou check out @joelsartore!
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#NOTAPET #kinkajou #madagascar #cuteanimals #natgeo #photoark #savetogether
Reposted in @gridsapp 1611712624318377584_8653261

#repostfrom @natgeo Image by @joelsartore | This #pollinatormonday showcases a curious kinkajou from the New York State Zoo. This furry pollinator is native to Central and South America, and is a member of the Procyonidae family, making it a distant cousin of the Raccoon. The kinkajou has ankles that can rotate 180 degrees which allows it to run very quickly down trees to evade predators like the harpy eagle. The kinkajou is often known as the “honey bear” due to its habit of raiding beehives for their honey, much to the dismay of the bees. Its short, coarse fur is natural protection against angry bee stings. When not raiding hives, its five-inch tongue allows it to easily dip into the flowers of fruit-bearing trees in the rain forest. This long tongue coupled with an insatiable sweet tooth makes the kinkajou a valuable pollinator for many fruits and flowers in the rain forest. Though classified basically as a carnivore, the kinkajou will go from flower to flower, drinking nectar, and spreading the pollen on its fur to the next tasty snack. Now that’s a handy sweet tooth! To see another image of this kinkajou check out @joelsartore! . . #notapet #kinkajou #madagascar #cuteanimals #natgeo #photoark #savetogether Reposted in @gridsapp

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List joelsartore's Instagram This #pollinatormonday showcases a curious kinkajou from the New York State Zoo. This furry pollinator is native to Central and South America, and is a member of the Procyonidae family, making it a distant cousin of the Raccoon. The kinkajou has ankles that can rotate 180 degrees which allows it to run very quickly down trees to evade predators like the harpy eagle. The kinkajou is often known as the “honey bear” due to its habit of raiding beehives for their honey, much to the dismay of the bees. Its short, coarse fur is natural protection against angry bee stings. When not raiding hives, its five-inch tongue allows it to easily dip into the flowers of fruit-bearing trees in the rain forest. This long tongue coupled with an insatiable sweet tooth makes the kinkajou a valuable pollinator for many fruits and flowers in the rain forest. Though classified basically as a carnivore, the kinkajou will go from flower to flower, drinking nectar, and spreading the pollen on its fur to the next tasty snack. Now that’s a handy sweet tooth!
To see another image of this kinkajou, check out @natgeo.
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#pollinatorhero #cuteanimals #NOTAPET #honeybear #wildlifephotography #nature #animalfacts #kinkajou #adorable #natgeo #photoark #savetogether 1611695949779819354_225429667

This #pollinatormonday showcases a curious kinkajou from the New York State Zoo. This furry pollinator is native to Central and South America, and is a member of the Procyonidae family, making it a distant cousin of the Raccoon. The kinkajou has ankles that can rotate 180 degrees which allows it to run very quickly down trees to evade predators like the harpy eagle. The kinkajou is often known as the “honey bear” due to its habit of raiding beehives for their honey, much to the dismay of the bees. Its short, coarse fur is natural protection against angry bee stings. When not raiding hives, its five-inch tongue allows it to easily dip into the flowers of fruit-bearing trees in the rain forest. This long tongue coupled with an insatiable sweet tooth makes the kinkajou a valuable pollinator for many fruits and flowers in the rain forest. Though classified basically as a carnivore, the kinkajou will go from flower to flower, drinking nectar, and spreading the pollen on its fur to the next tasty snack. Now that’s a handy sweet tooth! To see another image of this kinkajou, check out @natgeo. . . #pollinatorhero #cuteanimals #notapet #honeybear #wildlifephotography #nature #animalfacts #kinkajou #adorable #natgeo #photoark #savetogether

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List natgeo's Instagram Image by @joelsartore | This #pollinatormonday showcases a curious kinkajou from the New York State Zoo. This furry pollinator is native to Central and South America, and is a member of the Procyonidae family, making it a distant cousin of the Raccoon. The kinkajou has ankles that can rotate 180 degrees which allows it to run very quickly down trees to evade predators like the harpy eagle. The kinkajou is often known as the “honey bear” due to its habit of raiding beehives for their honey, much to the dismay of the bees. Its short, coarse fur is natural protection against angry bee stings. When not raiding hives, its five-inch tongue allows it to easily dip into the flowers of fruit-bearing trees in the rain forest. This long tongue coupled with an insatiable sweet tooth makes the kinkajou a valuable pollinator for many fruits and flowers in the rain forest. Though classified basically as a carnivore, the kinkajou will go from flower to flower, drinking nectar, and spreading the pollen on its fur to the next tasty snack. Now that’s a handy sweet tooth!
To see another image of this kinkajou check out @joelsartore!
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#NOTAPET #kinkajou #madagascar #cuteanimals #natgeo #photoark #savetogether 1611703472691762542_787132

Image by @joelsartore | This #pollinatormonday showcases a curious kinkajou from the New York State Zoo. This furry pollinator is native to Central and South America, and is a member of the Procyonidae family, making it a distant cousin of the Raccoon. The kinkajou has ankles that can rotate 180 degrees which allows it to run very quickly down trees to evade predators like the harpy eagle. The kinkajou is often known as the “honey bear” due to its habit of raiding beehives for their honey, much to the dismay of the bees. Its short, coarse fur is natural protection against angry bee stings. When not raiding hives, its five-inch tongue allows it to easily dip into the flowers of fruit-bearing trees in the rain forest. This long tongue coupled with an insatiable sweet tooth makes the kinkajou a valuable pollinator for many fruits and flowers in the rain forest. Though classified basically as a carnivore, the kinkajou will go from flower to flower, drinking nectar, and spreading the pollen on its fur to the next tasty snack. Now that’s a handy sweet tooth! To see another image of this kinkajou check out @joelsartore! . . #notapet #kinkajou #madagascar #cuteanimals #natgeo #photoark #savetogether

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List pursuerofbeauty's Instagram  __________

The Monarchs are making their way through central Missouri.

The photo is from a local  community garden near where I live. And it's a male nectaring on a Mexican Sunflower. If you look close you can see where the black spot bleeds through slightly from the hind wing.

There have been 6 - 10 around the garden throughout the summer. On Saturday morning there were 28 - I think .
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#pollinatormonday #pollinatorhero #savethemonarchs #bd_pro #macroclique #nature #natgeo  #conservation #naturephotography #theweekoninstagram 1611638558380841816_2068232713

__________ The Monarchs are making their way through central Missouri. The photo is from a local community garden near where I live. And it's a male nectaring on a Mexican Sunflower. If you look close you can see where the black spot bleeds through slightly from the hind wing. There have been 6 - 10 around the garden throughout the summer. On Saturday morning there were 28 - I think . __________ #pollinatormonday #pollinatorhero #savethemonarchs #bd_pro #macroclique #nature #natgeo #conservation #naturephotography #theweekoninstagram

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List instarestok's Instagram Rising this #pollinatormonday is the delicate sunbird, native to Eastern Africa. These pollinators have long, curved beaks used to dip deep into many different kinds of plants to feed on sweet nectar, especially lobelia, aloe, and red-hot poker trees. It is widely speculated in science that plants pollinated by sunbirds have co-evolved to fit the tubular shape of the sunbird's beak. These colorful and fast fliers are closely related to the honeyeaters of Australia, as well as the hummingbirds of the Americas, and are even known to occasionally hover while drinking nectar. Info & Picture by @joelsartore  ·
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#instarest #instarestwild #hummingbird #pollinator Edition by @instarestok 1610429282385988370_6061265734

Rising this #pollinatormonday is the delicate sunbird, native to Eastern Africa. These pollinators have long, curved beaks used to dip deep into many different kinds of plants to feed on sweet nectar, especially lobelia, aloe, and red-hot poker trees. It is widely speculated in science that plants pollinated by sunbirds have co-evolved to fit the tubular shape of the sunbird's beak. These colorful and fast fliers are closely related to the honeyeaters of Australia, as well as the hummingbirds of the Americas, and are even known to occasionally hover while drinking nectar. Info & Picture by @joelsartore · · · #instarest #instarestwild #hummingbird #pollinatorEdition by @instarestok

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List sharon4nature's Instagram The ultimate #pollinators at the  #pollinatorgarden KCS Garden Project. This #monarchs with a missing wing tip is thankful for the nectar offerings. Monarchs are a threatened species now. #pollinatormonday  #symbolicmonarchmigration #pollinatorhero #kcsmatters @kcsmatters 1610348519150758462_6087499612

The ultimate #pollinatorsat the #pollinatorgardenKCS Garden Project. This #monarchswith a missing wing tip is thankful for the nectar offerings. Monarchs are a threatened species now. #pollinatormonday #symbolicmonarchmigration #pollinatorhero #kcsmatters@kcsmatters

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List diomarmuhlmann's Instagram #Repost @natgeo (@get_repost)
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Image by @joelsartore | Rising this #pollinatormonday is the delicate sunbird, native to Eastern Africa. These pollinators have long, curved beaks used to dip deep into many different kinds of plants to feed on sweet nectar, especially lobelia, aloe, and red-hot poker trees. It is widely speculated in science that plants pollinated by sunbirds have co-evolved to fit the tubular shape of the sunbird's beak. These colorful and fast fliers are closely related to the honeyeaters of Australia, as well as the hummingbirds of the Americas, and are even known to occasionally hover while drinking nectar.
To see images of more incredible species, follow @joelsartore.
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#sunbird #birds #pollinator #purplebandedsunbird #pollinatorhero #animalfacts #wildlife #nature #biodiversity #wildlifephotography #natgeo #savetogether #photoark 1609016572255734616_428984049

#repost@natgeo (@get_repost) ・・・ Image by @joelsartore | Rising this #pollinatormonday is the delicate sunbird, native to Eastern Africa. These pollinators have long, curved beaks used to dip deep into many different kinds of plants to feed on sweet nectar, especially lobelia, aloe, and red-hot poker trees. It is widely speculated in science that plants pollinated by sunbirds have co-evolved to fit the tubular shape of the sunbird's beak. These colorful and fast fliers are closely related to the honeyeaters of Australia, as well as the hummingbirds of the Americas, and are even known to occasionally hover while drinking nectar. To see images of more incredible species, follow @joelsartore. . . #sunbird #birds #pollinator #purplebandedsunbird #pollinatorhero #animalfacts #wildlife #nature #biodiversity #wildlifephotography #natgeo #savetogether #photoark

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List socialbna's Instagram via @natgeo #social #toronto #nature #natgeo #travel #socialbna 
Image by @joelsartore  Rising this #pollinatormonday is the delicate sunbird, native to Eastern Africa. These pollinators have long, curved beaks used to dip deep into many different kinds of plants to feed on sweet nectar, especially lobelia, aloe, and red-hot poker trees. It is widely speculated in science that plants pollinated by sunbirds have co-evolved to fit the tubular shape of the sunbird's beak. These colorful and fast fliers are closely related to the honeyeaters of Australia, as well as the hummingbirds of the Americas, and are even known to occasionally hover while drinking nectar.
To see images of more incredible species, follow @joelsartore.
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#sunbird #birds #pollinator #purplebandedsunbird #pollinatorhero #animalfacts #wildlife #nature #biodiversity #wildlifephotography #natgeo #savetogether #photoark 1608921747564966799_3295392168

via @natgeo #social #toronto #nature #natgeo #travel #socialbna Image by @joelsartore Rising this #pollinatormonday is the delicate sunbird, native to Eastern Africa. These pollinators have long, curved beaks used to dip deep into many different kinds of plants to feed on sweet nectar, especially lobelia, aloe, and red-hot poker trees. It is widely speculated in science that plants pollinated by sunbirds have co-evolved to fit the tubular shape of the sunbird's beak. These colorful and fast fliers are closely related to the honeyeaters of Australia, as well as the hummingbirds of the Americas, and are even known to occasionally hover while drinking nectar. To see images of more incredible species, follow @joelsartore. . . #sunbird #birds #pollinator #purplebandedsunbird #pollinatorhero #animalfacts #wildlife #nature #biodiversity #wildlifephotography #natgeo #savetogether #photoark

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List photos_in_pjs's Instagram Incoming #hoverfly #pollinator #sunflower #pollinatormonday 1608249036023184402_3627556675

Incoming #hoverfly #pollinator #sunflower #pollinatormonday

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